Review of the 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5

The takeaway: The Hyundai Ioniq 5 all-electric SUV is an exceptional vehicle that makes you feel special, something that cannot be said for most electric vehicles on sale today. Hyundai says drivers will be amazed by the range and power. And after driving it, I agree. It is both comfortable, luxurious and fast. And with the maximum tax credit available of $7,500, Hyundai’s top-of-the-line version narrowly undercuts Tesla’s closest offer – $42,500 versus $42,690 for the base Model 3. (Remember that Teslas are still not eligible for the federal tax credit.)

  • When connected to an 800-volt charger, the Ioniq 5 can go from 10 to 80 percent battery in just 18 minutes.
  • 0-60 acceleration is excellent, but the Ioniq’s 20-60 mph acceleration is addictive.
  • Its ability to park autonomously, without anyone driving, is practical.

    Specifications

    • Base price: $43,650 (before incentives)
    • Motor: permanent magnet synchronous
    • Power: 225 hp (single engine), 320 hp (twin engine)
    • Torque: 258 lb-ft (single motor), 446 lb-ft (dual motor)
    • Range: 303 miles (single motor), 256 (dual motor)

      Learn more


      what’s in the name

      hyundai ioniq 5 in use

      Trevor Raab

      Electric vehicles have always had special names, and the Ioniq is no exception. The call sign is a kind of suitcase, combining the words ion and unique. And it’s clear that the SUV is indeed unique. Along with its futuristic aesthetic, the vehicle’s underpinnings make it accessible to newcomers to the EV space. Hyundai’s all-new global electric modular platform enables a more spacious interior and improved performance.

      Motorists all have their reasons for going electric. Many are fans of the reduced environmental impact and running costs. However, I’d bet a lot of them push them to make a statement. The Ioniq is absolutely your car if you fall into this camp. I’m sorry to say that your gold-wrapped Tesla Model S Plaid just isn’t going to cut it anymore.

      A behemoth that can boogie

      hyundai ioniq 5 in use

      Trevor Raab

      While the Ioniq 5 delivers impressive performance, it’s practical for driving in and around town. The accelerator pedal is linear at low speeds, making it easy to get away from stoplights, a rarity with electric vehicles. When navigating urban streets, Hyundai’s electric SUV simply feels like it’s in low Earth orbit, ready to put you in the back of your seat at a moment’s notice.

      With the arrival of our limited-spec Ioniq 5 tester with AWD, it was no surprise that acceleration was one of its strengths. Of course, its 0-60 was about as daredevil as any Tesla. However, the body roll from 20 mph was so impressive that one passenger reacted with “Good googly moogly!” I’ve never heard him say that before and I still don’t understand it.

      The Ioniq is by far one of the best electric vehicles I’ve driven because it does the impossible: hide its mass when changing direction. Hyundai tuned the chassis and suspension to make the Ioniq 5 somehow balanced in the corners while remaining soft and supple over the bumps. All this despite the fact that, like all plug-in cars, it has gargantuan curb weight to manage – our all-wheel-drive model tipped the scales at just over 4,400 pounds. In my testing, I rode it on some of the bumpiest roads near our office in eastern Pennsylvania, and the SUV just ate them up. It could wobble in continuous rough pavement, but that was very rare.

      Appearance of the concept car

      hyundai ioniq 5 in use

      Trevor Raab

      By name, the Ioniq is striking. The exterior looks like a 1980s version of what a “car of the future” might look like. And I mean that in the best possible way.

      One of the exterior highlights is Hyundai’s “parametric pixel” lights front and rear. Simply put, automatic high beams – at night – illuminate rectangular blocks (pixels, as Hyundai calls them) between the daytime running lights. Really, that does nothing for performance, the straight, clean lines simply adding to the vehicle’s already striking aesthetic. And the automatic high beams weren’t the best at turning off when another motorist was in front of me. There have been more than one occasion on the freeway where I accidentally blindsided several people and started to pass them with my tail between my legs.

      hyundai ioniq 5 in use

      Trevor Raab

      hyundai ioniq 5 in use

      Trevor Raab

      The rear lights feature the same pixel blocks. They look remarkably similar to the Hyundai 45 EV concept that the Ioniq 5 is based on. In fact, they’re so striking that there were plenty of passers-by asking me what I was driving simply because they had never seen anything. like.

      Next to any Tesla, the Ioniq definitely wins in the head-turning department. Its quasi-cyberpunk aesthetic is unlike anything else on the road right now. And it’s a breath of fresh air.

      Park Assist and Power Sharing

      hyundai ioniq 5 in use

      Trevor Raab

      The Ioniq 5 comes factory-installed with Remote Smart Park Assist (RSPA), which allows the vehicle to autonomously park in just about any parking spot without you being behind the wheel or even in the car. We’ve clearly come a long way since the first smart park rollout for the Hyundai Sonata in 2020 (or what the original Super Bowl ad called Smaht Pahk). All I had to do to activate the system was drive to the desired parking space with RSPA activated and wait for the car to validate the space. Once he recognized the space, I could either park and drive out or have the parking lot with me. From outside the car, I pressed the two buttons on the key fob which started the process. Releasing them stopped the car if I felt it was getting too close to surrounding vehicles. Yes, there were several instances where I had to disengage. The system is great in ideal conditions, but I wouldn’t rely on it if I was in a crowded city with impatient motorists waiting for me to initiate a parking maneuver.

      hyundai ioniq 5 in use

      Trevor Raab

      hyundai ioniq 5 in use

      Trevor Raab

      The second notable feature is Ioniq’s Vehicle-to-Load (V2L) feature, which allows it to provide external power. You can use it to power small appliances and electronics at a campsite or even charge other electric vehicles. The V2L works from the charging port of the Ioniq itself, but our limited-spec vehicle also came with a 12-volt wall outlet under the rear seats. Both are well-regarded inclusions that we’ve only seen before on pickup trucks like the Ford F-150.

      The verdict

      hyundai ioniq 5 in use

      Trevor Raab

      With so many EVs on sale today, there are several that appear to be derivatives of each other. That’s why it’s so refreshing to see Hyundai do its own thing with the Ioniq 5. For a truly awesome car that costs $43,650 before incentives, it’ll be hard to beat. The Korean automaker has announced that its electric SUV should be on sale at the end of 2022.

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