I think I’ve finally had enough of Assassin’s Creed Valhalla after Dawn of Ragnarok

After 180 hours, I think I’m finally done with Assassin’s Creed Valhalla. I gobbled up every map marker, every side quest, every trophy. Absorbed every iota of new storyline from DLC expansions so far, and even reinstalled Assassin’s Creed Odyssey to enjoy recent crossover stories with Eivor and Kassandra. And besides, I really enjoyed every minute. And yet, the new Assassin’s Creed Valhalla: Dawn of Ragnarok DLC feels outdated and unappealing in a way that nothing else has for this title to date. Maybe after all this time, I’ve had enough – and I think so has the game.

Part of the problem is its positioning. Dawn of Ragnarok is the start of Year 2 content for Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, and is therefore not part of the content included with the game’s original Season Pass. So, to dive into this mythological tale, you have to pay 32.99 £/$39.99 to access. Yes, for that price you get 30 hours of content, but if you dive into that after gobbling up everything Valhalla has had to offer so far, you’re going to be decidedly disappointed.

Assassin's Creed Valhalla Dawn of Ragnarok

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

It doesn’t help that the main appeal of this new premium DLC is playing like Odin, or Havi, as they’re also known. As you already did in the main game, you enter the new area of ​​Svartalfheim via a dream state, and this time it’s a quest to rescue Odin’s son, Baldr, from Sutr and the giants of the fire. To do this, Odin must call on the dwarves of Svartalfheim, and that’s basically where the story begins. Odin is a character we played as before, as part of the story threads that take you through Asgard and Jotunheim leading to the End of Assassin’s Cred Valhalla, but there’s something so disconnected about being Odin after spending so long telling Eivor’s story. I don’t care as much about Odin’s more personal situation.

So Odin-aire

Assassin's Creed Valhalla Dawn of Ragnarok

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

Maybe I’d care more if Odin’s story was as malleable as Eivor’s, but Dawn of Ragnarok lacks narrative choice. For a game where players have always deliberated who to save or what to do next, this is oddly bland. In fact, the early missions are more about finding bases and resources hidden around the map than advancing the story. There are some interesting story there, but it’s hidden behind countless quests that require you to follow an incredibly slow character from A to B, carry someone else there, and follow golden arrows through the environment.

Dawn of Ragnarok’s opening hours are full of tedious tasks, not enticing you to delve deeper into its mysteries, and that only makes the action itself worse. It might be unfair to ask a game’s fourth major DLC to break new ground, but it certainly needs a stronger hook. You’ll solve puzzles using the clumsy light beam mechanic, you’ll have to dodge rats – the bane of the Siege of Paris DLC – and you’ll still drag the same old boxes and crates to reach new areas. Maybe if you haven’t played all the DLCs and updates so far, you won’t feel so tired, but if you have, there’s little new for you here.

Assassin's Creed Valhalla Dawn of Ragnarok

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

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(Image credit: Ubisoft)

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