Horse racing app could be costing NH, officials say

Questions are being raised about a horse racing betting app that New Hampshire officials say is operating without a state license or regulation. Officials said the state could be missing out on hundreds of thousands of dollars in revenue. The TwinSpires app is being used by players in New Hampshire to bet on horse races across the country. As legal sports betting proliferates, that may seem like a big deal, but the New Hampshire Lottery’s chief executive said there is a problem. “They are not regulated by us, nor do they operate within the confines of state law,” lottery CEO Charlie McIntyre said. “So it’s a gray area. It’s a concern for us, obviously, because all other gambling in the state happens through us, or we either license it or regulate it. In this case, neither.” McIntyre said he has approached the app’s parent company, Churchill Downs Inc., about how to resolve the issue. He said nothing has happened yet and the state is not collecting the revenue it would normally get from licensing. “It’s hundreds of thousands of dollars, and they’ve been doing it for a number of years, so it’s a significant amount of money,” McIntyre said. News 9 has contacted TwinSpires for comment but has not received a response. The attorney general’s office said it is now aware of the app and is investigating its operations in New Hampshire. “The New Hampshire Department of Justice takes potential illegal gambling-related activities in the state very seriously,” said Attorney General John Formella. . “We have been made aware of concerns related to the Churchill Downs TwinSpires app and are currently reviewing them.” The New Hampshire Lottery has already tried to make an administrative rule change to bring the TwinSpires app into what it considers compliance, but that effort was unsuccessful, officials said. It could require a change in state law to resolve the situation and collect the revenue that lawmakers said is owed to taxpayers. “The biggest thing in all of this is the state’s ability to control it,” said state Sen. Lou D’Allesandro. “Otherwise, it gets out of control. When it gets out of control, there’s no way to get it back.”

Questions are being raised about a horse racing gambling app that New Hampshire officials say is operating without a state license or regulation.

Officials said the state could be losing hundreds of thousands of dollars in revenue.

The TwinSpires app is being used by players in New Hampshire to bet on horse races across the country. As legal sports betting proliferates, that may seem like a big deal, but the New Hampshire Lottery’s chief executive said there is a problem.

“They are not regulated by us, nor do they operate within the confines of state law,” lottery CEO Charlie McIntyre said. “So it’s a gray area. It’s a concern for us, obviously, because all other gambling in the state happens through us, or we either license it or regulate it. In this case, neither.”

McIntyre said he reached out to the app’s parent company, Churchill Downs Inc., to resolve the issue. He said nothing has happened yet and the state is not collecting the revenue it would normally get from licensing.

“It’s hundreds of thousands of dollars, and they’ve been doing it for a number of years, so it’s a significant amount of money,” McIntyre said.

News 9 has contacted TwinSpires for comment but has not received a response.

The attorney general’s office said it is now aware of the app and is investigating its operations in New Hampshire.

“The New Hampshire Department of Justice takes potential illegal gambling-related activities in the state very seriously,” said Attorney General John Formella. “We have been made aware of concerns related to the Churchill Downs TwinSpires app and are currently reviewing them.”

The New Hampshire Lottery has already tried to make an administrative rule change to bring the TwinSpires app into what it considers compliance, but that effort was unsuccessful, officials said. It could require a change in state law to resolve the situation and collect the revenue lawmakers owe taxpayers.

“What’s important to all of this is the state’s ability to control it,” said state Sen. Lou D’Allesandro. “Otherwise, it gets out of control. When it gets out of control, there’s no way to get it back.”

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