At $9,500, Could This 78 Toyota Corolla SR5 Liftback Be a Bargain?

Good Price or No Dice 1978 Toyota Corolla SR5 Liftback

Today Good price or no dice Corolla is a Toyota-branded model under the Liftback name, although the styling is very obviously a shooting brake. Let’s see if the price of this classic Corolla is to break the bank.

Although this is only his second effort, Paul McCartney’s RAMpublished in May 1971, is considered by many to be the the best solo album ever made by the ex-Beatle.

Many of you find the one from yesterday 2012 Ram 1500 R/T to not be quite such a nice effort. Praised for its color and 5.7 Hemi, the truck’s flaws were obvious – and literal – in its short cab and short bed. These aspects kind of crumbled the deal at its $17,000 request, as many of you expressed that bigger and better options are available. The result was a loss of 64% with no dice.

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Continuing with the theme of bigger and better, I would like to acknowledge that Toyota has done something remarkable lately. It has to some extent replenished the Corolla lineup that was once the company’s mainstay and at one point had more flavors than an overcrowded Snapple store.

While just a few years ago the Corolla lineup was downgraded to a single sedan body style, it’s now bounced back to include an aggressively styled five-door sedan and (‘natch) a small crossover. That, of course, pales in comparison to the Cambrian explosion of Corolla models that arrived in the mid-1970s.

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These ’70s models included both two- and four-door sedans, two-door hardtops, five-door wagons, and a long-deck hatch that the company called the “Liftback.” And that was just in the United States! All of these models were built around a fairly unremarkable but extremely sturdy and well-constructed rear-wheel-drive chassis, making them heavier and less spacious than the FWD competitors that were appearing at the time, but also much more forgiving. brutal treatment.

This 1978 Toyota Corolla SR5 Liftback it looks like it’s seen some rough days in the past, but since it’s a Toyota from the marque’s heyday, it looks a bit worse for that wear. The ad claims the car originated in Oregon, and a life lived in that state’s humid climate is evident in the light surface rust that covers just about every exposed, unfinished surface.

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Is everything bad? Probably not. And the seller says it’s nothing more than cosmetic, claiming the car underneath is “super strong.” The ad also states that the car has “95% original paint with its original, totally sweet 70s side decals. primer – or worse – on all horizontal surfaces and even a few that aren’t Overall either a work for Maaco or just a fresh patina to leave untouched and gaze upon for patterns and hidden meanings.

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The interior is a little less worn, although the carpeting up front looks dull and needs a good suds-rinse-repeat. Oddly enough, the carpets in the rear – facing the large hatch and shooting brake-style windows – look completely unfaded and in great shape.

Although the bodywork and interior may show signs of age and use, this is a 70s Corolla, so you can safely bet the mechanics still work without complaint. This consists of a 1.6-liter SOHC 2T-C four with 76 horsepower and 86 lb-ft of torque matched to a five-speed shifter and a live rear axle with a standard differential. It’s not the most exciting stuff, but for the ’70s five-speed was kind of big news.

A look in the engine compartment shows that the car is fitted with optional air conditioning, an air cleaner and a cam cover which both look oddly cooler than their surroundings. This particular air cleaner looks like some sort of ghostly apparition with its seemingly fresh off-white paint scheme. The heat shield under the brake master cylinder is also new, so some work has been done here.

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In total, this Corolla has put 106,000 miles on those mechanical parts and, according to the ad, has retained a clean title to the present day. If anyone is interested in gifting themselves this Liftback, they’ll have to come up with their request for $9,500. We’re about to decide if anyone really should.

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What do you think of this Corolla which asks for so much money? Does this sound like a deal for one of the only Toyota shooting brakes ever sold in the United States? Or, is this classic just too worn out to warrant so much?

You decide!

Baltimore, Maryland, craigslistwhere to go here if the ad disappears.

H/T to DWSmith for the hookup!

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